Infectolab - digestive system

Can Lyme Disease Affect The Digestive System?

One of the reasons Lyme disease is so hard to treat is the prevalence of misdiagnosis. But why do these cases of misdiagnosis occur on such a regular basis? Lyme has been recognized as a disease since 1975, when it was first discovered in the state of Connecticut. Yet we still know comparatively little about Lyme disease compared to other disorders. One reason is that the chronic form of the disease has yet to be legitimately recognized by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). This has unfortunately led to many medical professionals being undereducated in the symptoms of chronic Lyme.

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Infectolab - gut health

Can Lyme Disease Disrupt The Microbiome?

Lyme disease can cause serious issues throughout a patient’s entire body. This is one of the attributes that makes the disease so hard to pin down, and why reliable diagnosis is one of the most obvious problems doctors and patients face. Despite Lyme disease manifesting in all sorts of various ways, one of the areas it primarily affects is the gut. Around 70–80% of our immune system is controlled by our gut and the microbiome (helpful bacteria) contained within it. Lyme has a significant effect on immune regulation and often causes sustained inflammation in its chronic form. Therefore, Lyme disease has a major impact on gut health. This can severely impede recovery, leading to further issues and complications down the line. The subject of Lyme disease and the microbiome is often understudied by most doctors, yet its impact on the disease as a whole is significant.

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Infectolab - eye

Can Lyme Disease Affect Your Vision?

The toll Lyme takes on the body is hard to quantify. The chronic form of the disease affects all patients differently, often taking a long time to fully manifest. It is a particularly insidious disease in the pantheon of human afflictions, and unfortunately, one that we still know very little about. We know how it’s contracted: through ticks, which transfer the Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria as they bite their human hosts. We also know that Lyme is very curable in its acute stage. The problems start when we start getting into the chronic stage. Many doctors and medical professionals are not up to speed with chronic Lyme, which is not even viewed as a legitimate disease by many official bodies. Chronic Lyme disease can affect many different parts of a patient’s body. One of the less explored areas is the link between Lyme disease and vision.

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3 Ways Lyme Disease Can Damage The Nervous System

Even though it all stems from one tiny tick bite, Lyme disease can wreak havoc on the entire body. Many symptoms of Lyme are generalized and are often mistaken for other diseases. They manifest in different ways depending on the patient, and even within the same person they can appear inconsistent and misleading. Compounding this is the fact that Lyme exists within a medical grey area. It is undoubtedly a real condition, with hundreds upon thousands of sufferers all over the world. However, it is also not fully recognized in its chronic form. Unfortunately, the late stages of the disease are the most damaging, and it’s here that patients require the most care and consideration. Symptoms are varied and debilitating, primarily affecting muscles and joints. But neurological symptoms can also occur in some cases. So what is the link between Lyme disease and the nervous system?

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New ELISpot Test For Ehrlichia: How It Works

With Lyme disease visibility on the rise, there is much higher awareness of the real dangers this disease presents than there was ten years ago. Reported Lyme cases are going up every year, although this could potentially be attributed to the disease becoming more widely known. Lyme disease is quite easy to prevent, as we know exactly where it comes from and how to stop it; the causative bacteria (Borrelia) is transmitted to humans via tick bite, and in the early stages, the disease is easily treatable via antibiotics. If the acute Lyme window is missed, however, the chronic stage will inevitably develop some time after. Chronic Lyme is much more complicated to diagnose and treat, not least because the symptoms present differently for every patient.

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