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How To Identify Lyme Disease Rashes (And Their Lookalikes)

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection transmitted to humans through tick bites. When a tick infected with the borrelia bacteria manages to transfer it to a person, they may experience symptoms such as fever, chills, muscles and joint aches, headache, fatigue, and swollen lymph nodes. In some cases of Lyme disease, a rash will also develop. The rash most commonly associated with Lyme disease appears as a red bulls-eye shape. In medical terms, it is referred to as erythema migrans.

In as many as 30% of people with Lyme disease, however, a rash may not appear at all, or a different type of rash can develop that resembles that of various other conditions. To help determine if you have become infected with Lyme disease, it’s important to know what the rash looks like, what it could resemble, and at what stage in the disease it appears. Read on to learn how to identify Lyme disease rashes (and how to differentiate between their lookalikes).

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Can I Test Myself For Lyme Disease?

Our collective knowledge surrounding Lyme disease is something like an inverse funnel. We know a lot about how it is spread and contracted, but as the disease progresses, our understanding of it dissipates. One of the continuing problems we encounter is diagnosis. These are muddy waters, as Lyme exists in two very distinct forms: acute, which is legitimately recognized and lasts a number of weeks; and chronic, a far more malleable disorder that often mimics the symptoms of other diseases. Chronic Lyme is generally not acknowledged as a legitimate disorder, leaving patients and doctors undereducated about its symptoms and presentation. Diagnosis, therefore, is a major problem. This leads people who understand Lyme disease to wonder if it’s possible to test themselves for the disorder.

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