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Can Lyme Disease Be Misdiagnosed As Sjögren’s?

Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness, often referred to as “The Great Imitator” because of its vast list of non-specific symptoms. Initial Lyme disease infection can present similarly to flu, and late-stage symptoms can be similar to arthritis. Because of this, Lyme disease is often misdiagnosed as other conditions. And since treatment for Lyme disease needs to occur quickly to rid the body of the borrelia bacteria, these issues with diagnosis can make it much more difficult to get proper treatment and fully recover from the disease.

One example of a health condition that can be mistaken for Lyme disease (or vice versa) is Sjögren’s syndrome. But what is Sjögren’s syndrome, how does it affect the body, and how can Lyme disease be misdiagnosed as Sjögren’s? Read on to learn more.

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Could Lyme Disease Infection Increase Your Chances Of Developing Certain Cancers?

Lyme disease, caused by the borrelia bacteria, can cause a wide variety of different health issues – even after it has been treated. The bacteria can evade detection by the immune system in many ways. It inhibits the action of the immune system, changes its own outer membrane antigens so that immune cells can’t detect it, and hides within tissues in the body. It isn’t just the immune system that can get confused by the borrelia bacteria, but antibiotics as well. Because of the way borrelia biofilm blocks antibiotics from getting inside the extracellular matrix, antibiotics can be ineffective at killing it.

Due to these sly functionalities of the Lyme disease-inducing bacteria, it can often lead to the development of further health complications. But just how serious can these complications be? Does Lyme disease increase cancer risk, for example? 

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What Does A Lyme Flare-Up Feel Like?

Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that occurs when a tick infected with the borrelia bacteria latches onto a human host and feeds on their blood. During feeding, the bacteria makes its way into the bloodstream, where it spreads across the entire body and causes widespread symptoms. An initial Lyme disease infection feels much like the flu and has non-specific symptoms such as muscle aches, fever, chills, headache, and fatigue. 

Lyme disease can only be treated using antibiotics, but sometimes even treatment does not rid the body of the bacteria. If the borrelia bacteria manages to evade detection, it can hide in tissues and cause a condition known as chronic Lyme disease. When the bacteria stays in the body for a long time, Lyme can sporadically flare up in between periods of remission. So what does a Lyme flare-up feel like? And can you prevent it from happening?

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Can Lyme Disease Cause Jaundice?

Lyme disease is caused by the borrelia bacteria and can lead a variety of health complications if left untreated. Between three and 30 days after being bitten by an infected tick, a person may experience symptoms that resemble the flu, such as a fever, muscle and joint aches, headache, chills, and swollen lymph nodes.

A bulls-eye rash also appears around the site of the bite for the majority of people who have contracted the disease; however, 20–30% of people may not get a rash at all. Because of these non-specific symptoms, many people may not know that they’ve contracted Lyme disease and therefore won’t seek out proper treatment.

As the infection continues to plague the body, more symptoms will develop that can be more severe and damaging. These can include severe headaches and neck stiffness, a loss of muscle tone in the face, arthritis with joint pain and swelling, an irregular heartbeat, inflammation of the brain and spinal cord, and nerve pain. These symptoms can happen days or even months after a person first contracts the infection.

Clearly, Lyme disease has the ability to affect many organs in the body. But can Lyme disease cause jaundice as a result of liver problems?

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The Role of NapA Protein On Inflammation In Lyme Patients

Lyme disease occurs when the borrelia bacteria is transmitted from an infected tick. The first signs of infection are similar to that of a flu, and people are often unaware that they have Lyme disease at all. When they do get treated with antibiotics, it has long been thought that the Lyme-causing bacteria could evade detection and continue to cause health problems because of its ability to hide out in tissues. Researchers believe that when this happens, it leads to the host of symptoms and a condition known as post-Lyme disease syndrome.

Post-Lyme disease syndrome can lead to various health effects such as fatigue, restless sleep, aching joints or muscles, cognitive issues (such as speech problems or decreased short-term memory), and swelling in the knees, shoulders, and other large joints. When the borrelia bacteria stays in the body long enough to cause post-Lyme disease syndrome, it can also lead to inflammation that can cause permanent damage if it is left untreated.

Lyme disease has puzzled researchers for years, but new findings may have uncovered a link between a specific protein known as the NapA protein and its role in Lyme-induced inflammation and arthritis. Read on to learn all you need to know about this connection.

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